4-H IN AMERICA The foundations of what we now know as "4-H" began around the start of the twentieth century with the work of several people in different parts of the United States. The focal point of 4-H has been the idea of practical and “hands-on” learning, which came from the desire to make public school education more connected to rural life. Early programs tied both public and private resources together to benefit rural youth. Researchers at experiment stations of the land-grant universities and the United States Department of Agriculture [USDA] had noticed that adults in the farming community did…
In most areas of the United States the killer will be in your backyard and, if not, you can almost bet he can be found hiding in the “back forty.” In the mid 1970s, Lyme disease was first recognized in the northeastern town of Lyme, Connecticut. It was found to be the cause of a large number of cases of rheumatoid arthritis which was occurring in children living in the area. Since that time it has become the most common vector-borne disease of human beings in the United States. This infectious disease also affects countless numbers of our domesticated animals…
(From the general news sources of the time and the Breeder's Gazettes of that period.) In spite of the intense heat of July, there was a substantial rally in prices for hogs, cattle, butter, eggs, hides, wool, mutton, etc. … all the things that made up farms in 1932. It was the livestock that brought balance to farming and made it worthwhile, interesting, and (at best) profitable. But farmers were savvy to markets. They knew that markets went both up and down and that surge of Summer 1932 was too late, too shallow and too brief to make a whole…
(From the general news of the period, plus the Belgian & Percheron breed publications of the time.) Nikita Khrushchev, the Soviet leader, gave us (I think) a wonderful 4th of July present. He had been sort of shanghaied and voted out of the leadership by a bunch of old Stalinists, but the entire central committee had not been present so Nikita rounded them up and turned the tables on the old Stalininsts. Nikita wasn't exactly a lover of the red, white and blue, but he was sure a lot easier to live with than that bunch that tried to throw…
(From the general news sources of the day and the Autumn 1982 Draft Horse Journal.) I believe this to be the only photograph from the state of Tennessee that has ever graced a cover of The Draft Horse Journal. The teamster in this case was Jerry Cunningham, an attorney in nearby Maryville, which is about 15 miles south of Knoxville. Jerry and his father (retired from the insurance business) owned about 70 acres near the foot of the Great Smoky Mountains in eastern Tennessee. The farm was an avocation for both generations. At the time of this photo there were…
Disclaimer - This article is intended as general discussion and information on the topic covered, and is not to be construed as rendering legal advice. If legal advice is needed, you should contact an attorney. This article may not be reprinted or reproduced in any manner without prior written permission of the author. It’s time to get ready for the first show and you are reviewing your list of things not to forget. At the top of that list should be a current Coggins test. We all know it is important to have a Coggins test but do we know…
Specialty Classes have been offered at livestock shows for more than two centuries. They are usually found at breed exhibitions that have added significance. Breed organizations often fund them, as do interested individuals and the occasional sponsor. America’s state fairs many times offer such classes. A special class for the Champion State Bred Stallion and the Champion State Bred Mare is offered at most state fairs. Special classes such as these have also been offered at many Canadian exhibitions. Each North American Belgian Championship has offered specialty classes as has each World Percheron Congress. A special class offered for the…
How many of you think of the Humane Society of the United States as a benevolent benign group whose focus is to rescue, care for, and/or humanely dispose of the hundreds of thousands of unwanted dogs and cats? So did I. I have always looked at them with respect and lent my support. I am saddened to see their transformation into a radical animal rights group now aligned with PETA and the Farm Sanctuary. They are by far the wealthiest non-profit animal rights group. In 2005 they dedicated $11 million (9.2% of their budget) to “campaigns, legislation and litigation,” and…

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