Before there were golf courses at every turn, before lawn mowers outnumbered lawns, before commercial fertilizers were available at Wal-Mart, there was manure ... Interestingly, no one race, tribe or person can be attributed with the use of organic fertilizers to boost crops. Its history started with that of plant cultivation itself ... some 10,000 years ago. Native American tribes of the American east coast used fish to fertilize numerous crops. The most common species used for this purpose was the menhaden. The Narraganset called it "munnawhatteaug," which roughly translates to "that which manures." English colonists soon corrupted the word…
Stem cell regenerative therapy is perhaps the most important breakthrough in veterinary medicine since the discovery of sulfonamides and penicillin. I am quite sure that stem cell therapy will become a very important factor in the practice of human medicine as well. I have just returned from the Western Veterinary Conference at Las Vegas, Nevada, where I attended a program taught by a practicing veterinarian, William Rhoads, DVM, Dipl. ACVS, ABVP Equine, from Whitesboro, Texas. His lecture was entitled, “New Therapies for the Treatment of Lameness in Horses.” One of the treatments he has been using, in certain equine lameness…
(From the general news sources of the times, the 1933 Iowa Yearbook of Agriculture and the Breeder's Gazette.) Three interesting notes from May 1933: 1-Adolph Hitler, that scourge of mankind, busted all the trade unions in Germany. Extremely conservative types elsewhere were not totally critical of that particular act; 2-It was revealed that J.P. Morgan, one of the wealthiest Americans, dead or alive, had paid no income tax for either 1931 or 1932.This did not surprise everyone; and 3-Maurice Telleen, co-founding editor of The Draft Horse Journal, celebrated his 5th birthday on the 8th of May, 1933. There were seven…
(From the general news sources of the period and the Belgian and Percheron publications of the time.) In North Africa, Algeria was in full scale revolt against Paris and French domination. France returned their "strong man," Charles de Gualle to power. It didn't work 100%, but I doubt anyone expected it to. It probably did as much to calm things down as anything could have. It was a very tempestuous year all around the globe. Kind of like every other year in the last of the 1950s. China was planning it's "Great Leap Forward," called the biggest and most ambitious…
(From general news sources and the Summer 1983 Draft Horse Journal) The Summer '83 DHJ featured this registered Shire mare, Folly Farm Miranda, with her 1982 filly foal, Big Little Moonshine. Miranda was one of three Shire mares belonging to Audrey-Lyn & Jerry Stockton of Fort Collins, Colorado, at the time. They said the origin of the stable name was in the expression, "big ideas and little money." Here it is 25 years later and there is still quite a lot of that going around. This is also a back-door way of paying tribute to another wonderful old friend of…
Disclaimer - This article is intended as general discussion and information on the topic covered, and is not to be construed as rendering legal advice. If legal advice is needed, you should contact an attorney. This article may not be reprinted or reproduced in any manner without prior written permission of the author. In two cases, Johnson v. Minnesota Board of Veterinary Medicine, (Mn. Fourth Judicial District Court) and Mitz v. Texas State Board of Veterinary Medical Examiners (Travis County District Court, Austin, Texas), the state, through the state veterinary boards, are cracking down on “horse teeth floaters” by asking…
Rising fuel prices are a double-edged sword for draft horse breeders. Why? Stockmen in particular need to sharpen their pencils. Otherwise, they will find it difficult to survive. Traditional means of feeding cattle herds or flocks of sheep have involved little capital expenditure. Little fossil fuel is required. Such practices are environmentally-friendly. Employing teams of well-schooled draft horses in many livestock operations makes economic sense. The higher fuel prices go, the greater the savings. This will affect draft horse enthusiasts across the continent. I think the price paid for matched draft horse teams, which are well-broke to work, will increase.…
“You can die of good intentions.” That is the best summary I can give of an editorial I read recently about the bill to ban horse slaughter that was passed last year. The editor and I had discussed the issue when it was a hot topic. At the time she could not imagine “a horse being dragged across a kill floor with chains around its legs.” A gruesome description that elicits a sickening feeling in the heart of any sensitive being. But a few short months later, some of the bill’s supporters are taking a new look. One of the…

SUBSCRIBE: Sign up to receive a notification when the new quarterly journal is published, enter your email address below

Purchase This Issue