The World’s Foremost Heavy Horse & Mule Publication
The World’s Foremost Heavy Horse & Mule Publication
The World’s Foremost
Heavy Horse & Mule Publication
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  • Wow what a great issue! My second issue since I subscribed and it was really neat.

    – B. Szaton

  • Dear DHJ – Just a note to tell you how much I enjoy the Drafthorse Journal. I read it cover to cover... even the ads!

    – Marjorie Kreider

  • I can always tell when a new issue of The Draft Horse Journal gets mailed, because my phone starts ringing and business picks up.

    – Terry Pierce, Belgian Hill Farm

  • I have been a fan and serious student of The Draft Horse Journal for 25-plus years. I still carry the latest issue with me and refer to it almost on a daily basis.

    – Gary Nebergall

  • I can’t even tell you how much I love the Journal. It’s always a very special day for me when a new issue arrives.

    – Dennis Moss

  • So many orders came in from our ad in the DHJ. Thank you so much!

    – Sandy Lepley

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  • Wow what a great issue! My second issue since I subscribed and it was really neat.

    – B. Szaton

  • Dear DHJ – Just a note to tell you how much I enjoy the Drafthorse Journal. I read it cover to cover... even the ads!

    – Marjorie Kreider

  • I can always tell when a new issue of The Draft Horse Journal gets mailed, because my phone starts ringing and business picks up.

    – Terry Pierce, Belgian Hill Farm

  • I have been a fan and serious student of The Draft Horse Journal for 25-plus years. I still carry the latest issue with me and refer to it almost on a daily basis.

    – Gary Nebergall

  • I can’t even tell you how much I love the Journal. It’s always a very special day for me when a new issue arrives.

    – Dennis Moss

  • So many orders came in from our ad in the DHJ. Thank you so much!

    – Sandy Lepley

Those Koncarcalyps Genes

No Percheron breeder realized greater influence than T.B. Bowman, Boone, Nebraska, in designing the pattern of the Percheron breed that we know today. This should come as no surprise, for 75 stallions bred by the Bowman family headed 75 herds of pedigreed Percherons in Canada and the United States by 1942. The majority of them were sons of Koncarcalyps.

In 1875, T.B. Bowman, a boy of 17, rode a saddle horse into the new state of Nebraska with little more than clothes in his saddle bag. Given his tender age, his older sister had to file for the 160-acre homestead that he soon owned. By 1900 this property had grown into a ranch of over 1,000 acres in size. Cognizant of the need for improved draft horses to open the new state, following his visit to Chicago's 1893 Columbian Exposition, Bowman gathered all information he could on the Percheron breed that had captured his eye.

Although he had owned three pedigreed Percherons earlier, Bowman purchased Ocean (Imp), a 9-year-old French-bred stallion in 1908; together with Coral, a 3-year-old daughter of Corolian (Imp). In 1909 Bowman registered his first home-bred Percheron. This was Coralena, a chestnut Ocean (Imp) filly foaled by Coral. From this modest start, T.B. Bowman assembled a herd of pedigreed Percherons that numbered over 200 head when the United States entered World War II on December 7, 1941.

Click here to read the full story!

Yes, That's Who They Are
reprinted from the August 1966 DHJ

From D. M. Coddington, R. 3, Box 280B, Piqua, Ohio: "I am writing concerning the picture of the pulling team inside the horseshoe on page three of the Journal and on your letterhead. I believe I know the team. I believe they are Rock and Tom owned by George Statler of the Statler Farms, Piqua, Ohio. I live within five miles of where the team was owned and pulled during the early '30s. They won several world championships including three times in Michigan. The excellent caretaker and driver of the team was Russell Sando. The manager of Statler Farms was Walter Schimmel, who accompanied Sando wherever he went. Mr. Sando was very particular about the care of the horses, the fit of their harness, the smoothness of their bedding, etc. The team was quiet to hitch to a load with no fuss or loud talk around them at anytime."

From Clifford J. Carr, Rt. 1, Box 20, Casstown, Ohio, "I would like to know if you know the team in the horseshoe at the top of your stationery. I think I know what pair they are–Rock and Tom, owned by Statler Farms, Piqua, Ohio and driven by Russell Sando. He was a good driver and well thought of. When I was a boy my Dad took me to see them pull."

(Editor's note: Messrs. Carr and Coddington were correct. The team pulling through the shoe on our letterheads and on page three in every Journal is the same Rock and Tom these two readers remember. This great pair of Belgians established a record in 1933 when they exerted a tractive pull of 3,825 lbs. and exceeded this in 1935 when they made a pull of 3,900 lbs. for the full distance of 27-1/2 ft.; their combined weight was 4,440 lbs.)

 

Jawing With Jason Julian – President of the American Brabant Association

Amidst all this coronavirus chaos, we, like everyone, have been in need of something uplifting, so we decided to visit with Jason Julian, President of the American Brabant Association, owner/operator of Julian Family Farm and owner/operator of Legacy Horse Logging. To clarify, that list is not his resumé ... it's a list of his current titles.

The farm is run by Jason and his family (wife Katrina and sons Michael, Joshua and Aaron), and consists of 300 acres (strictly hay, oats and pasture) near Medford, Wisconsin. They operate a certified grass-fed organic dairy and beef enterprise utilizing Jersey/Fleckvieh-crosses as a dual-purpose animal (milk and meat). They milk around 50 head and provide certified organic grass-fed beef both on the farm and through Medford County Market, which boasts of the largest natural foods section in north-central Wisconsin. They handle the stocking, inventory and provide samples of 15 different cuts. They also meet customers, answer questions about their farm and products and host a "Meet Your Farmer Day" at their place.

Meet Jason Julian in the Summer 2020 issue!

Appropriating the Belgian Breed – The Conqueror Story

This is a story about a line of horses–a paternal line: father and son and grandson and so on, down to the present time. The tale should be of interest to all livestock breeders, even those who don’t know a Belgian from a Clydesdale.

It was Darwinian evolution in its highest form, but these horses not only survived, they appropriated their breed, took it over for themselves. What should impress is the rapidity with which it happened: five generations.

Read on. You will meet the folks who made it happen.

2019 All-North American Shire Contest Winners

The All-North American Contest has been an annual competition for the past nine years. Based closely upon the original All-American programs for Belgians, Percherons and Clydesdales, it has provided an historical photo record of the top halter animals being exhibited across Canada and the U.S. The competition itself is not a show. It is tabulated mathematically, and therefore, may best be described as “the average opinion of the majority of contemporary judges of the major Shire shows in the U.S. and Canada.” It has been administered as a collaborative effort with the American Shire Horse Association and the Canadian Shire Horse Association.

Pictured is the 2019 All-North American Horse of the Year, RM's MT Autumn.Congratulations to breeders Turie & Michael Sorrell, Concord, VT, and to owner Dr. Jeff Gower, Springfield, MO. This is the second time this mare was chosen as the All-North American Horse of the Year.

See complete results & photos in the Spring 2020 issue or click here!

 

Field of Dreams - Jessica Crannell-Menard

Heavy horses in the under-saddle world are still a groundbreaking enterprise, but meet the World Show wonder who will eat your doubt for breakfast & spin it into a win.

Bookended by the wine country of the Tualatin Valley and the neighboring Chehalem Mountains, the 1870s railroad boom gave birth to the town of Cornelius, Oregon, and from that town hails a queen: an untiring champion of the ridden Clydesdale.

She can be intimidating. She’ll command your respect from the get-go. But engaging in conversation with this striking and sophisticated benefactor of the heavy horse under saddle is the eye-opener that positively delights. Yes, she’s tough. Yes, she’s insanely talented and doggedly competitive. Her candid dialogue is salted with wit and charm to keep you laughing. Most importantly, Jessica Crannell-Menard is never short on jocular enthusiasm when it comes to the horse of her heart: the Clydesdale.

Read the full article starting on page 104 of the Spring 2020 issue!

History of Draft Horses

The Industrial Revolution proved to be responsible for both the rise and collapse of the heavy horse in America. Demand for draft animals was spurred on by the growing transportation, construction and agricultural needs of the nation. The last half of the 19th century made draft horse breeding both essential and profitable. Massive importations from Europe took place. The period also ushered in the development of the present day breeds of heavy horses. The number of horses and mules in The United States peaked in 1920, at about 26 million. The groundwork for today’s agriculture had been laid. The horse lost the battle of the streets to the automotive industry rather quickly. As for the battle of the agricultural fields, it fought very tenaciously, but eventually yielded in most cases to greatly improved tractor power. By 1950, it was indeed, on thin ice... Read more

History of The Draft Horse Journal

The post WW II years were not kind to the draft horse and mule. Both horse numbers and horse use plummeted. The number of animals being exhibited dwindled and many shows dropped heavy horses altogether. The industry needed a boost and it got one when the first issue of The Draft Horse Journal was published in May 1964. New interest was stimulated and the heavy horse has since made a convincing resurgence. From the 28 pages in the first issue to over 300 in recent ones, The Journal has grown, evolved and progressed right along with the draft horse trade. In addition to the magazine’s traditional content, covering breeding, raising, showing, selling and using all breeds of heavy horses, the modern version includes veterinary advice from “America’s Draft Horse Vet,” Dr. A.J. Neumann; historical accounts by the publication’s founder, Maurice Telleen; legal advice from Ken Sandoe;... Read more

Draft Horse and Mule Youth & Beginners Manual

"This is the first bulletin prepared by the DRAFT HORSE & MULE ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA which was incorporated in the state of Illinois in October of 1980. It contains information that should prove valuable to the new or beginning draft horse and mule owner, whether he or she be a youth or an adult.

"Several men with many years of experience have given generously of their time to help prepare this bulletin. We do not claim that it is without error, we only hope to give you some information that will make it more interesting and hopefully contribute to your success, as you begin working with man's most noble helper–the draft horse and mule." Click here to download

Letter to the Editor

I would like to take this opportunity: the Draft Horse Journal’s fiftieth year in publication: to acknowledge and bestow gratitude upon, not only the founders of this fine magazine, but the current editor and his team who relentlessly strive to unify our industry through their quality quarterly publication.


The draft horse industry is not a product-driven industry. We do not yield an item that humans willingly wish to consume; like milk, meat, feathers or fur. Except for a rare sliver of history, when naturally-synthesized premarin was of value, the draft horse has contributed little in the last 75 years... Read more