The World’s Foremost Heavy Horse & Mule Publication
The World’s Foremost Heavy Horse & Mule Publication
The World’s Foremost
Heavy Horse & Mule Publication
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  • Wow what a great issue! My second issue since I subscribed and it was really neat.

    – B. Szaton

  • Dear DHJ – Just a note to tell you how much I enjoy the Drafthorse Journal. I read it cover to cover... even the ads!

    – Marjorie Kreider

  • I can always tell when a new issue of The Draft Horse Journal gets mailed, because my phone starts ringing and business picks up.

    – Terry Pierce, Belgian Hill Farm

  • I have been a fan and serious student of The Draft Horse Journal for 25-plus years. I still carry the latest issue with me and refer to it almost on a daily basis.

    – Gary Nebergall

  • I can’t even tell you how much I love the Journal. It’s always a very special day for me when a new issue arrives.

    – Dennis Moss

  • So many orders came in from our ad in the DHJ. Thank you so much!

    – Sandy Lepley

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  • Wow what a great issue! My second issue since I subscribed and it was really neat.

    – B. Szaton

  • Dear DHJ – Just a note to tell you how much I enjoy the Drafthorse Journal. I read it cover to cover... even the ads!

    – Marjorie Kreider

  • I can always tell when a new issue of The Draft Horse Journal gets mailed, because my phone starts ringing and business picks up.

    – Terry Pierce, Belgian Hill Farm

  • I have been a fan and serious student of The Draft Horse Journal for 25-plus years. I still carry the latest issue with me and refer to it almost on a daily basis.

    – Gary Nebergall

  • I can’t even tell you how much I love the Journal. It’s always a very special day for me when a new issue arrives.

    – Dennis Moss

  • So many orders came in from our ad in the DHJ. Thank you so much!

    – Sandy Lepley

Appropriating the Belgian Breed – The Conqueror Story

This is a story about a line of horses–a paternal line: father and son and grandson and so on, down to the present time. The tale should be of interest to all livestock breeders, even those who don’t know a Belgian from a Clydesdale.

It was Darwinian evolution in its highest form, but these horses not only survived, they appropriated their breed, took it over for themselves. What should impress is the rapidity with which it happened: five generations.

Read on. You will meet the folks who made it happen.

2019 All-North American Shire Contest Winners

The All-North American Contest has been an annual competition for the past nine years. Based closely upon the original All-American programs for Belgians, Percherons and Clydesdales, it has provided an historical photo record of the top halter animals being exhibited across Canada and the U.S. The competition itself is not a show. It is tabulated mathematically, and therefore, may best be described as “the average opinion of the majority of contemporary judges of the major Shire shows in the U.S. and Canada.” It has been administered as a collaborative effort with the American Shire Horse Association and the Canadian Shire Horse Association.

Pictured is the 2019 All-North American Horse of the Year, RM's MT Autumn.Congratulations to breeders Turie & Michael Sorrell, Concord, VT, and to owner Dr. Jeff Gower, Springfield, MO. This is the second time this mare was chosen as the All-North American Horse of the Year.

See complete results & photos in the Spring 2020 issue or click here!

 

Field of Dreams - Jessica Crannell-Menard

Heavy horses in the under-saddle world are still a groundbreaking enterprise, but meet the World Show wonder who will eat your doubt for breakfast & spin it into a win.

Bookended by the wine country of the Tualatin Valley and the neighboring Chehalem Mountains, the 1870s railroad boom gave birth to the town of Cornelius, Oregon, and from that town hails a queen: an untiring champion of the ridden Clydesdale.

She can be intimidating. She’ll command your respect from the get-go. But engaging in conversation with this striking and sophisticated benefactor of the heavy horse under saddle is the eye-opener that positively delights. Yes, she’s tough. Yes, she’s insanely talented and doggedly competitive. Her candid dialogue is salted with wit and charm to keep you laughing. Most importantly, Jessica Crannell-Menard is never short on jocular enthusiasm when it comes to the horse of her heart: the Clydesdale.

Read the full article starting on page 104 of the Spring 2020 issue!

The Stallion That Made The Biggest Impact On My Breeding Program

This being the Annual Stallion Issue, we've asked three prominent breeders, of the Clydesdale, Belgian and Percheron persuasions, to tell us about the one stallion that they feel made the largest impact upon their (or their employer's) respective breeding programs. We harnessed each participant with no restrictions in terms of whether or not the horse was living or dead, owned by them personally, or by someone else. We simply asked that they explain their choice in their own words and provide some examples of the lasting impact. Following is the outcome of that request ...

At Armageddon Clydesdales, we have been blessed to stand a number of truly outstanding stallions over the years. Perhaps the most storied was Broadlea Classic Joe who topped the list of America's leading Clydesdale sires in the last 25 years (1990-2015) in the Bruce Roy article which appeared in The Draft Horse Journal, Winter 2016-'17. Also of note were Armageddon's Lord Jacob, Solomon's Tim and National Champion Stallion Northwest Glenord's Shea. However the stallion which made the biggest impact on our program was none of these. He was Solomon's Commander.

Read more

All The King's Horses – The Undeniable Influence of Pleasant View King

"When John, Susan and Chad Cole founded their Pennwoods Stud at Centre Hall, Pennsylvania, they were determined that the Percheron stallions purchased for their breeding program were well-bred with a wealth of character. Today, Pleasant View King, the 24-year-old Percheron sire, continues to head the Pennwoods breeding program. Chad, Rhonda and Jordan Cole are among North America's most influential breeders of today's Percheron horse." — Bruce A. Roy

Since 2003, a total of 40 draft horses–Percherons, Belgians and Clydesdales–have been sold at public auction for $50,000 or more. Twenty-three of them have been Percherons. Of these 23, one was an own son of Pleasant View King; one an own daughter; four are grandsons; and five are granddaughters. Put another way, King appears in the first or second generation of nearly half of the Percherons–and 27% of ALL draft horses–that have been marketed at this extreme level.

Read the full story in the Winter 2019-'20 issue!

 

It's Not Always About Winning

“It's not always about winning,” according to second-generation Clydesdale breeder Jeff Goodell of Gilmore City, Iowa. For the Goodells, it's definitely always about family.

That's why, when each of eight Clydesdales was led to the wash rack on the first day of the 2019 Britt (Iowa) Show, all four of the Goodell boys could be found working together like a well-oiled (and well-lathered) machine.

Read more in the Winter 2019-'20 issue!

History of Draft Horses

The Industrial Revolution proved to be responsible for both the rise and collapse of the heavy horse in America. Demand for draft animals was spurred on by the growing transportation, construction and agricultural needs of the nation. The last half of the 19th century made draft horse breeding both essential and profitable. Massive importations from Europe took place. The period also ushered in the development of the present day breeds of heavy horses. The number of horses and mules in The United States peaked in 1920, at about 26 million. The groundwork for today’s agriculture had been laid. The horse lost the battle of the streets to the automotive industry rather quickly. As for the battle of the agricultural fields, it fought very tenaciously, but eventually yielded in most cases to greatly improved tractor power. By 1950, it was indeed, on thin ice... Read more

History of The Draft Horse Journal

The post WW II years were not kind to the draft horse and mule. Both horse numbers and horse use plummeted. The number of animals being exhibited dwindled and many shows dropped heavy horses altogether. The industry needed a boost and it got one when the first issue of The Draft Horse Journal was published in May 1964. New interest was stimulated and the heavy horse has since made a convincing resurgence. From the 28 pages in the first issue to over 300 in recent ones, The Journal has grown, evolved and progressed right along with the draft horse trade. In addition to the magazine’s traditional content, covering breeding, raising, showing, selling and using all breeds of heavy horses, the modern version includes veterinary advice from “America’s Draft Horse Vet,” Dr. A.J. Neumann; historical accounts by the publication’s founder, Maurice Telleen; legal advice from Ken Sandoe;... Read more

Draft Horse and Mule Youth & Beginners Manual

"This is the first bulletin prepared by the DRAFT HORSE & MULE ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA which was incorporated in the state of Illinois in October of 1980. It contains information that should prove valuable to the new or beginning draft horse and mule owner, whether he or she be a youth or an adult.

"Several men with many years of experience have given generously of their time to help prepare this bulletin. We do not claim that it is without error, we only hope to give you some information that will make it more interesting and hopefully contribute to your success, as you begin working with man's most noble helper–the draft horse and mule." Click here to download

Letter to the Editor

I would like to take this opportunity: the Draft Horse Journal’s fiftieth year in publication: to acknowledge and bestow gratitude upon, not only the founders of this fine magazine, but the current editor and his team who relentlessly strive to unify our industry through their quality quarterly publication.


The draft horse industry is not a product-driven industry. We do not yield an item that humans willingly wish to consume; like milk, meat, feathers or fur. Except for a rare sliver of history, when naturally-synthesized premarin was of value, the draft horse has contributed little in the last 75 years... Read more