The World’s Foremost Heavy Horse & Mule Publication
The World’s Foremost Heavy Horse & Mule Publication
The World’s Foremost
Heavy Horse & Mule Publication
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  • Wow what a great issue! My second issue since I subscribed and it was really neat.

    – B. Szaton

  • Dear DHJ – Just a note to tell you how much I enjoy the Drafthorse Journal. I read it cover to cover... even the ads!

    – Marjorie Kreider

  • I can always tell when a new issue of The Draft Horse Journal gets mailed, because my phone starts ringing and business picks up.

    – Terry Pierce, Belgian Hill Farm

  • I have been a fan and serious student of The Draft Horse Journal for 25-plus years. I still carry the latest issue with me and refer to it almost on a daily basis.

    – Gary Nebergall

  • I can’t even tell you how much I love the Journal. It’s always a very special day for me when a new issue arrives.

    – Dennis Moss

  • So many orders came in from our ad in the DHJ. Thank you so much!

    – Sandy Lepley

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Heavy Horse Calendar

  • Wow what a great issue! My second issue since I subscribed and it was really neat.

    – B. Szaton

  • Dear DHJ – Just a note to tell you how much I enjoy the Drafthorse Journal. I read it cover to cover... even the ads!

    – Marjorie Kreider

  • I can always tell when a new issue of The Draft Horse Journal gets mailed, because my phone starts ringing and business picks up.

    – Terry Pierce, Belgian Hill Farm

  • I have been a fan and serious student of The Draft Horse Journal for 25-plus years. I still carry the latest issue with me and refer to it almost on a daily basis.

    – Gary Nebergall

  • I can’t even tell you how much I love the Journal. It’s always a very special day for me when a new issue arrives.

    – Dennis Moss

  • So many orders came in from our ad in the DHJ. Thank you so much!

    – Sandy Lepley

A Tip of the Hat to Reinvention

Zenith City of the Unsalted Seas Did you know that Pie à la Mode was invented (yes, invented) in Duluth, Minnesota? Well, it was, and if that doesn't qualify the city as an interesting place, nothing will. But it is. Located on the extreme western point of Lake Superior, the greatest Great Lake (the largest freshwater lake in the world, in fact), it's where the St. Louis River empties into the lake creating a natural harbor. This was a natural transportation artery for the Sioux and Chippewa people after they were pushed east by European settlers. Explored by French trader Pierre Esprit Radisson in 1659 for the purpose of expanding the fur trade, Daniel Greysolon, Sieur du Lhut, another Frenchman, came in 1679 to establish routes for the trade. In 1856, the city was named "Duluth" after him. Read more

2018 Horse Progress Days – 25 Years!

Clare, Michigan, had the privilege of hosting the 25th annual Horse Progress Days (HPD) on June 29 and 30, 2018. Hosts Alvin Yoder and his wife Rosie, and son Leroy and his wife Mary Ann graciously allowed their properties to be invaded by the thousands of people who showed up at the event. One of the themes that kept coming back was that this was the best organized HPDs ever. This is quite a compliment for the local planners, many of whom were not local at all, but spent hours on the road traveling to and from planning meetings from the scattered Michigan Amish communities that came together to make it work.

See full coverage in the Autumn issue!

 

Those Wonderful Westerdale Mares

Eight of 64 Clydesdale stallions and females nominated for 2017 All-Canadian Clydesdale honors were foaled by Clydesdale mares bred at Westerdale, by Dale Rosenke, Olds, Alberta. However, the Westerdale story line doesn't end here. Two daughters of Westerdale Friendly Fiona were 2017 Reserve All-American Mares. Surely, this is a testament to Rosenke's success as a breeder of Clydesdale horses.

Dale Rosenke bred Clydesdales at his Westerdale farm for over four decades. Dale sought disposition, size, conformation, bone, bottoms, character, action and quality in the breeding stock he owned–traits that won the Clydesdale breed fame. Few horsemen studied the breed as Dale did, while no breeder was a greater critic of the Clydesdale horses that they bred, bought or exhibited. Read more

Sale reports start on page 103 of the Summer Issue!

The overall average on Gordyville's 2018 consignment was $9,109. While that's "only" $8 more than last year's, it still qualifies as the all-time record high. But that's just the beginning ... Mare mania was evident as Belgian mares averaged $9,149, which is a record by over $300. As with the overall average, the record it shattered was only a year old.

The Percheron mares averaged $11,153. Impressive as that is, it fell $521 short of last year's categorical average. The auction top, incidentally, came from this division via the 3-year-old Brier Valley Lilly, selling for $87,000. The only draft mare to sell for more was Bittersweet Unexpected Surprise, also a Percheron, at the 2009 Gordyville Sale, for an added two grand.

Read the full Mid-America Sale report, plus Mid-Ohio, Southern Indiana, Waverly Midwest Spring Sale & many more in this issue!

 

Letter to the Editor

I would like to take this opportunity: the Draft Horse Journal’s fiftieth year in publication: to acknowledge and bestow gratitude upon, not only the founders of this fine magazine, but the current editor and his team who relentlessly strive to unify our industry through their quality quarterly publication.


The draft horse industry is not a product-driven industry. We do not yield an item that humans willingly wish to consume; like milk, meat, feathers or fur. Except for a rare sliver of history, when naturally-synthesized premarin was of value, the draft horse has contributed little in the last 75 years... Read more

History of Draft Horses

The Industrial Revolution proved to be responsible for both the rise and collapse of the heavy horse in America. Demand for draft animals was spurred on by the growing transportation, construction and agricultural needs of the nation. The last half of the 19th century made draft horse breeding both essential and profitable. Massive importations from Europe took place. The period also ushered in the development of the present day breeds of heavy horses. The number of horses and mules in The United States peaked in 1920, at about 26 million. The groundwork for today’s agriculture had been laid. The horse lost the battle of the streets to the automotive industry rather quickly. As for the battle of the agricultural fields, it fought very tenaciously, but eventually yielded in most cases to greatly improved tractor power. By 1950, it was indeed, on thin ice... Read more

History of The Draft Horse Journal

The post WW II years were not kind to the draft horse and mule. Both horse numbers and horse use plummeted. The number of animals being exhibited dwindled and many shows dropped heavy horses altogether. The industry needed a boost and it got one when the first issue of The Draft Horse Journal was published in May 1964. New interest was stimulated and the heavy horse has since made a convincing resurgence. From the 28 pages in the first issue to over 300 in recent ones, The Journal has grown, evolved and progressed right along with the draft horse trade. In addition to the magazine’s traditional content, covering breeding, raising, showing, selling and using all breeds of heavy horses, the modern version includes veterinary advice from “America’s Draft Horse Vet,” Dr. A.J. Neumann; historical accounts by the publication’s founder, Maurice Telleen; legal advice from Ken Sandoe;... Read more